Metro program helps kids navigate life during pandemic

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January marks National Mentor Month and Big Brothers Big Sisters here in Omaha have said that children with mentors can be a very positive factor in their lives, especially as they navigate the harsh reality of growing up. with the challenges of COVID-19. It’s a bond like no other, with an age gap that quickly fades when they’re together. “He’s my best friend,” said Alex Johnson, a “little” part of the Big Brothers Big Sisters program. “I learned a lot from Alex. He’s really introspective and can really think through a lot of things,” said Andrew Stevens, his older brother. Alex and Andrew have spent the past three years building lasting memories. “We can go do a lot of fun things and have a good time together,” Stevens said. From hiking and basketball to board games, it’s times like these that create a strong relationship at a time when Alex needs Andrew the most. hit the pandemic, Alex’s life changed completely from seeing his older brother Andrew all the time to almost not at all. “I felt like I would never see this guy again,” said Alex. “It was quite difficult.” A lack of socialization has led many children to develop mental health problems, such as anxiety and depression. “Young people, especially teenagers, are really struggling with mental health issues and increased suicide rates,” Nichole Turgeon, CEO of Big Brothers, Big Sisters of the Midlands. Turgeon said luckily many of the children participating in the program did not have to go through it on their own. “To have that outlet, to have this other person that they could talk to about what they were going through, going through and experiencing,” Turgeon said. An outlet that helps Alex navigate what life is like during a pandemic. positive things in the environment around me, ”said Alex. Turgeon said they were looking for more people in the community to get involved and volunteer to help transform other young children like Alex. If you’re interested, the best way is to go directly to their website, bbbsomaha.org.

January marks National Mentor Month and Big Brothers Big Sisters here in Omaha have said that children with mentors can be a very positive factor in their lives, especially as they navigate the harsh reality of growing up. with the challenges of COVID-19.

It’s a bond like no other, with an age gap that quickly fades when they’re together.

“He’s my best friend,” said Alex Johnson, a “little” member of the Big Brothers Big Sisters program.

“I learned a lot from Alex. He’s really introspective and can really think through a lot of things,” said Andrew Stevens, his older brother.

Alex and Andrew have spent the past three years building lasting memories.

“We can go do a lot of fun things and have a good time together,” Stevens said.

From hiking to basketball to board games, it’s times like these that create a strong relationship at a time when Alex needs Andrew the most.

“Last school year, my sixth year, I was completely gone,” Alex said.

When the pandemic struck, Alex’s life changed completely, from seeing his older brother Andrew all the time to almost not at all.

“I felt like I would never see the guy again,” Alex said. “It was pretty hard.”

A lack of socialization has led many children to develop mental health problems, such as anxiety and depression.

“Young people, especially teenagers, are really struggling with mental health issues and increased suicide rates,” Nichole Turgeon, CEO of Big Brothers, Big Sisters of the Midlands.

Turgeon said luckily many of the children participating in the program did not have to go through it on their own.

“To have that outlet, to have this other person that they could talk to about what they were going through, going through and experiencing,” Turgeon said.

An outlet that helps Alex understand what life is like during a pandemic.

“Encouraging me to do more better and positive things in the environment around me,” said Alex.

Turgeon said they were looking for more people in the community to get involved and volunteer to help transform other young children like Alex.

If you are interested, the best way is to go directly to their website, bbbsomaha.org.


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